• Launch of new name and brand at the first annual Leadership Retreat September 2014

  • The percentage of our students who graduate from high school and are accepted at a four-year college or university

    100%

    CORE VALUES
    100%
  • The amount awarded in scholarships to the 2014 graduating class of 146 students

    $15.8 M

    RESULTS
    $15.8 M
  • The percentage of first-generation college students who attend our schools

    85%

    DEMOGRAPHICS
    85%
  • The percentages of students who are from economically disadvantaged homes

    75%

    PREPARATION
    75%
  • The number of 6th through 12th graders on our seven campuses across the state of Texas

    4,100

    OUR NETWORK
    4,100

Our young women are exceeding academic expectations and proving all students, regardless of their background or socio-economic status, can excel if given the right opportunity.
Our schools have a foundation of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum with a focus on our core values: Leadership, College Readiness, Wellness Life Skills.

With a killer smile, positive attitude and no notes, Karla R tells the audience of legal professionals about her life-changing experience at Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School in Dallas. She is the first high-school graduate in her family. Her parents emigrated from Mexico and her mother often reminded the almost 18-year-old that if they had stayed in Mexico, Karla would probably “have been someone’s housekeeper and probably have two children by now.” Instead she has graduated with honors, has received a dozen scholarships for college, and is attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Then she dropped an ironic note. When her father left Mexico at the age of 16 with nothing and without family, his first job was working at the power plant at the same university where, …“ 33 years later, through his sacrifice, through my mother’s, through my family, through YWPN, through all the support and nourishment that I received, I will be coming back to UNC not as a laborer but a student.”